Best Ground Blind Reviews [2020]

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Best Ground Blind Reviews [2020]

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The best ground blind right now is Barronett Blinds’ Big Cat 350; it has ample space, is relatively lightweight, and is durable enough to last four or five seasons.

It’s excellent quality for the money while reliable in harsh conditions. It’s portable at a reasonable 19 lbs, yet spacious inside. Three people to spend the day hunting in comfort. Not to mention, it’s an excellent height for tall hunters and archers alike.

That said, it entirely depends on what you’re looking for in a ground blind. Do you want a lightweight portable two-man blind? Or are you looking for a hard-wall semi-permanent blind to raise off the ground on a platform?

For this article, I’ve researched between 15 and 20 ground blinds and whittled the list down to the following six. They are all reviewed in detail for this article. Each has something unique to offer.

I’d also like to make a special mention for the following three ground blinds. They are excellent blinds, but sadly I left them out of the article. It’s because I felt that another ground blind with better characteristics offered the same function.

Next, I’d like to take you through some considerations when looking for a hunting blind. That said, if you’re just here to see the best ground blinds, then scroll straight down to that section.

Tree stand or ground blind?

Before considering ground blinds, don’t forget that there’s an alternative—the tree stand.

Tree Stand Hunting

Using a tree stand allows you to get out of a deer’s line of sight. Get the wind right, and you have a significant advantage over the deer. My personal belief is that on the ground, conditions are more challenging.

If tree stand conditions are right, it’s the best way to gain a significant advantage over your prey and take it home.

That said, when calling and rattling, clever bucks may be aware that the noise doesn’t come from ground level. They’ll immediately be suspicious of your calls. And, from time to time, you won’t be able to find an appropriate tree from which to hang your stand.

Ground Blind Hunting

Being on the ground can be great fun. Getting up close and personal with game by calling and rattling during the rut can be what hunting is all about. Beat the ground and beat the bushes to create authentic fight sounds and coax out other bucks.

Down on the ground, though, as soon as your game sees you, it’s out of there. A great technique is to set up two hunters – one to make the calls and the other out of the line of sight to make the kill.

In the end, there are pros and cons to each. Your decision will come down to what you’re hunting and the area in which you’re hunting. Do your homework and then go set up early to make your tree stand or hunting blind part of their natural surroundings.

The Three Main Types of Ground Blind

Open Blinds

An open ground blind is the most straightforward design of the three. It has stakes driven into the ground and panels behind which the hunter can hide. Typically, they have cutouts for shooting or draped fabric or reflective material to help camouflage you. The best open blinds use this reflective material as mirrors to reflect the ground’s pattern around your blind. This reflection improves your concealment.

Open blinds are generally simple, lightweight, cheap, and great for mobility. Unfortunately, archers will find themselves too visible to hunt from them. They work best for rifle and crossbow hunting. In most cases, they also lack rooves, which leaves you open to the elements.

Pop-up Blinds

Pop-up blinds have evolved from the open blind to provide a more comfortable and semi-permanent option. The best pop up hunting blind will camouflage you well in your surroundings. It will protect you against the wind, and have a waterproof roof and walls. It will also give you space to sit on a chair instead of on the floor. Capacity ranges from one or two occupants to as many as five.

Depending on your specific needs, easy-to-setup and lightweight hunting blinds maintain portability. A pop-up blind doesn’t have to stay in one place, and indeed many travel great distances with them. Its frame is made of flexible materials so you can fold and pack it for storage.

Hub-style Blinds

The hub-style blind is a premium upgrade of the pop-up blind. You should leave these feature-rich concealments in place for the whole season. They have heavy frames and high-quality fabrics to better protect and hide the hunter. They are the least portable ground blind available. It’s typically more expensive than pop-ups thanks to its high-grade materials.

Mobility

The type of ground blind you buy influences how easily you move. That said, each type still has various options to make your ground blind more or less portable.

Hard-sided Ground Blinds

Some hub-style ground blinds come with hard walls. These are excellent permanent fixtures that will protect you from wind and rain while insulating you far better. You don’t want to set these up for each hunt, though. You might change them every season or even leave them permanently.

Ease of Setup

The best hunting blinds are super easy to set up these days. Check out how easy it is to set up this hub-style blind from Ameristep:

When you’re on a day hunt with an open or pop-up blind, you don’t want to spend time setting up or packing up. You want to spend the most time on your hunting. On the hunting blind reviews below, I’ve said how easy setup is for each ground blind. You can also check reviews from other buyers to make sure there’s nothing out of the ordinary.

Ease of Transportation

Weight is an essential factor in portability. Lightweight materials may make the blind more comfortable to transport. They are sometimes (not always!) more prone to damage, though. Look for light fabrics and hubs that don’t compromise on material quality.

Remember that a large ground blind has a large frame. That makes it considerably heavier.

Also, lightweight hunting blinds will often sacrifice stability. They can be blown away by the wind. Take care to stake them well to the ground.

If you’re looking for a blind that is portable yet high-quality, I recommend the Care Taker from Ameristep. A high-quality portable option at a reasonable price.

Taking a seat

For mobility, it doesn’t get any better than the open blinds. The trade-off, though, is that you end up sitting on the floor. If you’re planning to be in the same spot all day, it can get a little uncomfortable.

If you have a pop-up blind, then you can take ground blind chairs with you. A word of advice: each seat adds to the weight you’re carrying, so look for light hunting chairs to lighten your load.

If you’re happy without a seat, then I recommend the GhostBlind 6-Panel Runner Blind. It’s lightweight and easy to carry around if you hunt over a distance.

Durability

Parts

A hunting blind has two main parts, the frame, and the fabric.

Frame

The frame is the support from which the fabric hangs. The frame shape defines the number of walls. Its weight and material affect the blind’s portability and ability to stand firm in the wind.

Fabric

The fabric hangs from the frame to conceal you from animals. It also protects you from wind and rain and creates spaces (cut-outs) from which to shoot. More windows mean a wider panorama of your environment and better visibility of your target. Many hunting blinds cover cut-outs in a protective mesh to stop insects and bugs from entering.

Some pop-ups and lots of hub-style blinds have pockets and other features sewn into the fabric.

Waterproof your fabric

The fabric should be waterproof. The best waterproof ground blind on the market is not bought; it’s optimized at homeGround blind specifications typically say either ‘water-resistant’ or ‘waterproof’. If it only says water-resistant, I recommend taking your ground blind into the garden and spraying it all over with this fabric guard (magical potion) from 303 products.

You may hear people tell you to use a silicon-based product.Do not!

It doesn’t repel oils or alcohol, not to mention it has a smell and tends to yellow over time. What you’re looking for is a product containing a fluoropolymer, because it bonds very well. The 303 fabric guard will stop even those little stitch holes from leaking through, and for a very long time.

Even if your blind does say it’s waterproof, do this anyway. It won’t hurt and may repair it or maintain it to keep water out of your blind for the foreseeable future.

Wind

The wind can have a significant impact on your hunt. Your ground blind must stand tall and not collapse. Otherwise, you’re in for a rocky session.

The type of ground blind you choose will increase or decrease the wind’s influence. In an open blind, you might suffer from the cold, but you’ll be in control of your shots. Pop-up and hub-style blinds benefit from sturdy frames as well as high-quality materials and pegs to secure them. Some (semi-)permanent blinds – likeThe Range from Terrain – boast hard walls that don’t succumb to the wind and keep you very comfortable inside. But hey, you won’t be going very far with that blind on your back.

Customer Service & Warranty

All companies have good and bad customer service days, depending on your problem, who you talk to, and the company’s underlying policy. I’ve heard generally good things about the companies in the review section below, although no company is infallible.

For example, I’ve heard fantastic things about Ameristep, replacing faulty or broken parts without kicking up a fuss. But, I’ve also read an Amazon review by a disgruntled customer.

I always recommend buying on Amazon. The manufacturers must follow their strict quality guidelines. They’ll also help you follow up with issues.

You can also contact each manufacturer directly. Here’s a list of contact details (telephone and mail) for each provider of the ground blinds listed in our review section:

12 Quick & Useful Hunting Tips for a Ground Blind

Before you read these tips, I want to give full credit for most of them to antlerscore.com. I’ve taken many of them from this fantastic Youtube video.

They are excellent tips for ground blind hunting and well worthy of their place in this article. I’ve written out some of my favorites below.

  • Air it out! Whether it’s a new blind or you’ve got it out of storage for the new season, you don’t want to open it up for the first time out in the woods. Ideally, you’ll open it up and leave it in your preferred hunting spot. Doing so will allow animals to get used to it so you can take them by surprise come the day of the hunt.
  • Waterproof your blind! I already touched on this earlier in the article, but get your hands on a high-quality fabric guard and coat your blind in it. It will keep the rain out and maintain its color while remaining odorless. #bargain
  • Clear the space! Wherever you decide to place your blind, take a couple of minutes to remove all stones, branches, and twigs from what will be underneath the blind. When you’re about to take a shot, you may be adjusting your feet, and standing on a twig will immediately alert your prey.
  • Set up downwind! Easy to say and sometimes harder to do. Try and set up your blind downwind from the spot where you think the game will be appearing. Animals have killer noses, and one whiff of something new will make them leave in a hurry.
  • Pick the right spot! Avoid setting up too far from the edge of the trees. Instead, break a few branches so you can push your blind right in under the canopy and blend in. Similarly, avoid setting up along the skyline (i.e., on the top of a hill). It stands out like a sore thumb to both humans and animals, reducing your chances of them coming up close.
  • Brush it in/camouflage! I’ve seen some excellent jobs that people have done to blend into their environment. Use branches and foliage from the surrounding area to make it look natural. You can use the transportation handholds and loops on the blind to feed branches through and conceal the blind.
  • Pick a chair! Get out there and find the best ground blind chair for you. It doesn’t matter if you end up sitting on a log, a bucket, a camping chair, a desk chair, or the latest silent 360º swivel chair from Hawk (yes, I did buy this). Get comfortable and get practicing from a seated position or seated to standing silently and fluidly.
  • Keep your windows closed! You get a new ground blind and will be excited to open up all the cutouts for the best view. Don’t! It’s far more conspicuous. Open as few as you can manage. If you open up a cutout, keep the fire-through mesh closed as it keeps the blind camouflaged.
  • Be aware of the light! So when you open up two cutouts simultaneously, you immediately light up the whole blind, and your silhouette is visible to animals at 100 yards. It’s such a disaster and yet such an easy mistake to make. If you open one cutout, be careful to keep the others closed.
  • Buy a cheap rubber-backed throw rug!A rubber-backed throw rug on which to place your ground blind chair will stop the chair from sinking into the forest floor. It will also provide an excellent dry spot to leave gear on or take your shoes off. Try it.
  • Wear black! Camo looks tremendous, and we all want to wear it, but it’s so visible. If you sit in the shadows of a ground blind, the best way to go unnoticed is wearing dark colors.
  • Sit in the shadows! The closer you are to the front window, the more conspicuous you become. Take a step back and give yourself a yard or two space. You’ll be less visible and have more room to raise your weapon.
  • Gain space by hanging things! Modern ground blinds are made of strong materials that won’t buckle under the weight should you want to hang things from the inner frame. In the video above, they hang their bow from the internal structure for easy access using these reusable gear ties, which look to be the business.
  • No expandable broadheads on shoot-through mesh! That’s right. It doesn’t apply to everyone, but it’s probably not a good idea. You may well trigger them to open prematurely, which significantly reduces their effectiveness.

If you have any tips, I would love to hear them. Leave a comment at the end of the article, and I’ll go ahead and add them to this list.

Best ground blind reviews

Best overall ground blind: Barronett Blinds’ Big Cat Pop Up Portable Hunting Blind

Blind weight: 19 lbs | Blind height: 6’8’’

Available since January 2019, the Barronett Blinds Big Cat 350 is my favorite overall ground blind. It’s an easily-transportable yet durable pop-up blind design of very high-quality which doesn’t price itself out.

The blind weighs in at (an advertised) 19lbs, although it may weigh a couple of pounds heavier in reality. Although it won’t keep you warm, it’s sturdy framework makes it stand firm in heavy wind and rain. Despite this, the materials remain light enough to transport around easily.

Do be aware of the wind; several owners have said that the material tends to flap and make a noise in high winds. The noise can scare off game.

This blind is spacious.

Height-wise, it stands 6 feet 8-inches tall, meaning that the tallest hunters (or archers) will not suffer for headroom, a real concern with other blinds. In floorspace, the diameter is 70 inches or 5 feet 10-inches. The blind’s quirky hub shape means that you have a massive 90 inches (7 feet six inches) at elbow level.

You can happily fit three people in the blind without any problem or a tripod camera. You could fit a fourth adult but, with equipment, it wouldn’t be at all comfortable for a long hunting session.

Depending on your hunting terrain – particularly in hills or on uneven terrain – it can be challenging to keep the floor perfectly flush to the ground.

The blind has several windows at both a standing and seated height. The windows are zipper-less for noiseless adjustments. The windows and door use a loop and toggle to open and close (silent!).

I like the seated-height view, as you can stay comfortable while keeping an eye out for movement. Despite this, the blind is designed for shooting while standing, particularly with tall bows. The various gun ports and low profile windows have shoot-through camo mesh covers.

It’s worth remembering that this is a portable pop-up blind. Although the stakes aren’t low quality, if you leave the blind out for several days in varying conditions, it can struggle to stay pinned down. If you remain in the blind, you won’t have any problems.

The design comes in three camos (backwoods, blades, and blood trail), so you can choose one which suits your local hunting backdrop. The interior is entirely black to help reduce shadow and conceal movement from the outside.

It’s the best hunting blind for a reason. Every aspect works well, and it’s good for the money too. If these characteristics suit your style, look no further than this blind.

Check out our in-depth review of the Big Cat 350 here.

Pros

  • Excellent quality for the money
  • Excellent in harsh conditions
  • Portable (19 lbs)
  • Built of sturdy materials
  • best ground blind for bowhunting: excellent height for tall hunters or long recurve bows
  • Shoot-while-standing design for various weapons
  • Many windows (at multiple heights)
  • Easily fits three people
  • Great for remaining seated
  • Three camos to choose from: backwoods, blades, and blood trail

Cons

  • May make noise in high wind
  • Excellent width is a downside on uneven terrain (not flush to the ground)
  • Flimsy stakes

>> Check Price on Amazon <<

Best ground blind for the money: Ameristep Care Taker Ground Blind

Blind weight: 13.5 lbs | Blind height: 5’6”

There are so many great reviews for the Ameristep Care Taker Ground Blind. This blind is very different from the Big Cat 350. It’s not big, it’s not spacious, nor will it likely stand up in tornado winds.

And we don’t care.

They got so many things right about this blind. It weighs 13.5 lbs – super light for ease of transportation. It’s the definition of a pop-up blind, opening up and ready to use immediately (within five minutes). And best of all, they smashed the price point. The price is liable to change on Amazon, but you can often snap this up for under $100 – a steal for one of the best deer blinds.

The setup is effortless. The Spider Hub® technology means metal-ended hubs pop out from each wall panel to form the base footprint, which measures 55 inches by 55 inches.

Although I said that it wouldn’t stand up in tornado winds, many customers recognize that it certainly does its best. It’s a robust blind, made of high-quality materials, which stand both the test of time and the test of terrain. Although some people like to buy a new ground blind every season, there’s no reason why this one won’t last you 3-5 seasons or more, depending on use.

As for the test of terrain, this blind is very damage-resistant. Don’t be scared of snagging or tearing the fabric on nearby branches or in heavily-wooded areas. On the outside of the frame, you have the Durashell™ Plus fabric to keep you dry (yes, it’s waterproof) and to shield you from the wind. On the inside, you have a ShadowGuard™ interior coating, which will reduce shadow and silhouette visibility from the exterior. You also have replaceable camo shoot-through mesh on the inside.

The blind has 360º visibility thanks to its nine window openings. Two people won’t struggle for elbow space, with 5’9” of shooting width, although the 5’6” height can be frustrating for tall hunters. Mainly because if you take a chair, you’ll find the windows are a little too high to shoot through from seated. Depending on your height, you end up perking up on the end of your chair in a squat to shoot from a decent angle.

The window system, on the one hand, provides excellent visibility. Unfortunately, the camo-netting velcro over the windows is a big disappointment because it’s just so loud. My hot tip is to use some clothes pegs for pegging them back and avoiding the velcro.

The door zipper is equally loud, but I’m not bothered about this because you shouldn’t be jumping in and out all the time.

In summary, it’s a very different option from the Big Cat, but does an excellent job for what it is – a highly-portable, easy-to-setup two-person ground blind – and all that at an unbeatable price. I read a couple of years ago that they discontinued the Care Taker, but this is wrong. It’s still available both on the official website and on Amazon.

Check out our in-depth review of the Ameristep Care Taker here.

Pros

  • Best ground blind for the money
  • Best two-person hunting blind
  • Insanely easy to set up
  • Built for portability (13.5 lbs)
  • Very strong in wind and rain

Cons

  • Noisy door
  • Very noisy window velcro
  • Strange height

>> Check Price on Amazon <<

Best budget: Ameristep Doghouse 2-Man Ground Blind

Blind weight: 12 lbs | Blind height: 5’6’’

The Ameristep Doghouse is a feature-light mid-range quality ground blind at an exceptional price.

It’s an easy-to-set-up pop-up blind, which is built for portability. It comes in an easy-to-transport bag and weighs in at around 12 lbs.

I’ll make no claims it’s the best hunting ground blind available; people typically buy this blind because of its low price. Despite this, it’s a reasonably good-quality blind for one or two people.

I believe that any negative reviews for the blind are because of false expectations. It’s not a set-it-and-forget-it blind like the Big Cat 350. It is ideal for a day hunt, taking it home with you the same day.

Customers that have tried to fix it down for a season, in general, have had poor results, like ripped fabric or even disappearing ground blinds. In theory, you could replace the six-inch stakes with nine or ten-inch stakes to secure it better. You could spend time restitching the loops to make them stronger. You could waterproof it yourself.

But to be honest, if that’s what you’re looking for, you should just buy a different blind.

The dimensions are 5 feet by 5 feet. It’s billed as a two-person blind (which it is!), although it’s rather cramped for two people with all the gear. A couple of archers will struggle side by side, but photographers, rifle-hunters, and crossbow owners may fare better.

If you’re a tall person, forget about it. It’s 5’6” tall. The window-height placement is impressive and possibly best adapted to photographers with tripods. With a firearm, you will need to shoot from a chair or a kneeling position.

It has an excellent visibility field, with a door on one side and shooting windows on the remaining three. You can even open the door at the top to have 360º shooting. The windows have shoot-through mesh porthole covers included. Unfortunately, the windows are noisy due to the velcro, so I recommend buying pegs to open them silently.

On the inside, it has the same ShadowGuard™ technology to reduce shadows and silhouettes. On the outside, it also has the Durashell™ Plus fabric shell with a matte finish. I’d call it water-resistant more than waterproof. It will keep you dry enough, but the heavier the rain, the more likely you will get wet. The roof has small pin-shaped holes through which water can run. See my tips earlier in the article about waterproofing your blind.

The Doghouse was excellent to set up and comfortable enough to fold up; however, it wasn’t as easy as the Care Taker. If this is what most worries you, go with the Care Taker for a little extra money.

In summary, you’re getting what you pay for with this blind. A portable light blind for one person (two at a stretch) that is liable to bullying by the elements. Personally, I’d spend a little more for the Care Taker, but the Doghouse has lots of thrilled customers.

Check out our in-depth review of the Ameristep Dog House here.

Pros

  • Best budget ground blind
  • Best ground blind for photographers
  • Easy to set up
  • Lightweight and portable

Cons

  • Cramped for two people
  • Noisy velcro windows
  • Not waterproof
  • Bad for tall people

>> Check Price on Amazon <<

 

Most spacious blind: Barronett Blinds Ox 5 Pop Up Portable 5-Sided Hunting Blind

Blind weight: 33 lbs | Blind height: 6’0’’

Whereas the Care Taker and the Doghouse were very functional pop-up blinds, the Ox 5 Pop Up Blind from Barronett is a premium hub-style blind. I know that shooting from an attractive blind won’t make the shot for you, but I think that the Ox 5 looks good.

It also takes space to a new level; in this blind, you feel like you’re at a strategic lookout on the edge of the battlefield. You can take the kids, their grandkids, their friends and pets too. On a serious note, it’s billed as a 3-4 person blind, but depending on how much gear you have, you can squeeze in more.

It has a novel five-sided design, which gives you a massive 70% more space than four-sided blinds of similar characteristics. It’s a massive 8 feet in diameter and stands 6-feet tall.

You can be sure that this blind won’t be going anywhere, regardless of rain, wind, or snow. It’s tough as nails, with heavy-duty poles and metal ball and socket hubs to create a sturdy base. It’s built of 2 layers of high-quality 300D (300 deniers) polyester fabric—an interior no-scratch layer with color-rich material, a softer exterior layer.

To understand what this means, the higher the denier, the more durable the fabric. For a quick comparison, our favorite blind – the Big Cat 350 – only has a fabric of 150D. This stuff is hard to scratch and won’t be letting any unwanted light into the blind. Similarly, it won’t let anything out, so you can quickly heat one of these blinds in the winter.

It has three gun ports and a couple of peek windows at the back for a 360º view, although you won’t be firing on game behind the blind. The main window is 180º. The windows feature an adjustable silent-slide system, which beats the velcro options on the other blinds hands down. Depending on your height, you may be able to shoot in this six-foot-tall palace. But if you’re taller, you’ll likely shoot from seated. Like our other blinds, it comes with replaceable shoot-through mesh on the windows.

This 33-pound blind is not an ‘easy-to-transport’ ‘let’s go for the day’ pop-up. You generally set this up for the season in a well-chosen location. Make a few trips to set it up with all your comforts, from blind chairs to heaters to whatever else you normally take. Don’t mistreat it because you think it ‘can take it’ though. I’ve seen some left out in all sorts of weather conditions, and after 12 months, they completely lost their color (and stand out like a sore thumb).

Pros

  • Most spacious ground blind
  • Silent-adjustable windows
  • Hub-style leave-it-out blind
  • Indestructible!

Cons

  • Not easily transportable
  • Some can’t shoot standing
  • May lose color if left out too long

>> Check Price on Amazon <<

Best hard-wall: Terrain 80121 The Range of Ground Blinds

Blind weight: 121 lbs | Blind height: 7’1’’

‘The Range’ blind from Terrain is the best hard-wall ground blind on the market.

The positives and negatives of a hard-wall over a pop-up are apparent. This high-density polyethylene hard-wall is low maintenance. It’s UV protectedextraordinarily durable, and will last for many years. The downside is you won’t be moving it any time soon. Once it’s been set up, it’s permanent. It has a heavy-duty door frame and a latch to keep it locked while you’re away.

The base length and width is 75 by 72 inches, with a weight of 121 lbsHeight-wise, it measures a tall 7’1”, offering far greater comfort to tall hunters than the great majority of its pop-up counterparts.

The Range protects you well against the elements – wind or snow – thanks to its overlapping walls and window awnings. I would say that for extra protection, you’d do well to use spray foam insulation to fill in some small(ish!) gaps around the door and between the walls and ceiling, as cold air and a little rain can come in.

Despite this, I didn’t feel too cold. Plus, there’s plenty of space for two hunters, their gear, and a heater to keep you warm.

It’s a five-sided blind which, aside from providing more elbow room, gives excellent 360-degree visibility.

The windows are at an excellent height for shooting, particularly from a ground blind chair. The windows are made of plexiglass, which is tinted. The tinted glass is nice because it does away with silhouettes and shadows from outside.

Another benefit of the hard walls is that it’s more difficult for animals to hear your small movements from outside the blind.

The setup comes in ten different pieces, with pre-drilled holes to make it easier. It lends itself to DIY jobs with a little imagination. If you wanted to, you could mount it to a platform and raise it on a stand, for example. Some people really want a ground blind with a floor. If useful, check out this video on how to assemble it

Pros

  • Best hard-wall ground blind
  • Better noise insulation than pop-ups
  • Excellent height for tall hunters
  • Great size for shooting from ground blind chairs
  • Offers generally strong protection against the elements
  • Good for DIY jobs
  • UV protection
  • Durable and long-lasting/low maintenance

Cons

  • Small gaps that need spray-foam insulating to make airtight
  • Not portable

>> Check Price on Amazon <<

Most transportable: GhostBlind 6-Panel Runner Blind

Blind weight: 8 lbs | Blind height: 26’’

The 6-Panel Runner Blind by GhostBlind is no ordinary ground blind. It’s an eight-poundsix-panel ‘runner blind’ designed to pack up and transport around on your back with ease.

When you reach your location, you unfold it around you and sit on the ground behind it. Unlike typical ground blinds, the panels are made of an unbreakable plastic that reflects the environment around them.

It’s genius because it blends in with its surroundings. You don’t need to leave it out for hours so that the game gets used to it being there. It appears completely invisible.

What’s more, animals won’t see themselves or sun reflections either, as the mirrors only reflect the ground within about four feet of the blind.

Unfortunately, at 26 inches tall, it’s pretty damn awkward to hide behind and can’t be used with a chair or stool. It’s not for archers either. It will only work with rifles or crossbows, as they’re small enough to hide them. A final negative is that you have to keep the plastic clean to reflect well.

Setup and pack up is 30 seconds. When packed up, it folds to 26 by 16.5 inches. You won’t find anything easier to pack up and carry around than this.

For many, this won’t be your style. That said, if you’re always on the move, I’m impressed by this ground blind.

Check out our in-depth review of the Ghostblind 6-Panel Runner Blind here.

Pros

  • Most transportable ground blind – super lightweight and easy to carry
  • Immediate use – animals don’t need to get used to it

Cons

  • Hard to scoot down and hide behind
  • Must sit on the floor
  • Cannot be used with a chair or stool
  • No good for archers
  • Must be kept clean to remain reflective

>> Check Price on Amazon <<

Summary

Your hunting style and what you look for in a ground blind will significantly influence your decision. If you’re looking for an all-round excellent ground blind, look no further than Barronett Blinds Big Cat 350.

The best hunting blind for the money, though, is the Ameristep Care Taker Ground Blind. People love its versatility and great price. For a very cheap hunting blind, check out the Ameristep Doghouse, as it still does a good job.

Some hunters will be looking for a lightweight, portable option. It’s the 6-Panel Runner Blind by GhostBlind. Although be aware, it’s certainly not designed with comfort in mind.

Finally, there’s the massive Ox 5 Pop Up Blind from Barronett to feel like you own the forest with all that space.

If you’re a DIYer, check out ‘The Range’ hard-wall blind from Terrain.

 

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